2013-01-31

PyCon US 2013: Highlighting LadyCoders, dotCloud, PyCoder’s Weekly, and Counsyl

PyCon has grown in just about every way possible, and it’s due in part to the generosity of the organizations that pledge their support each year. 2013 is going to be the biggest and best year yet with many new initiatives on tap like the Young Coder event and the recently announced Sponsor Tutorials. We’re up to a few more things you’ll find out about in the coming months, so for now find out what some of our sponsors are up to.

LadyCoders

LadyCoders is one of several supporters in our OSS/Community Sponsors group, and we’re glad to have them on board this year. The Coders consist of a group of of women who, simply, write code. They’re not a Python specific group, but they support the conference because of the environment it promotes.

“From the code of conduct, to PyLadies and PyStars, to the general feeling of welcoming that we always feel when amongst the Python community, this is a mission that we support and of which we are incredibly happy to be a part,” says Tarah Wheeler Van Vlack.

The LadyCoders run a very active blog as well as monthly meetups in Seattle, Washington, and occasional seminars. Their next seminar, titled Rocket Propelled Careers, is planned for February 23 in New York, with registration now open at http://ladycoders.com/event-registration/?ee=5. The event, which shares the LadyCoders’ experiences with breaking into the software world, will take place at the offices of 10gen (who also sponsor PyCon!) The seminar runs all day and covers topics such as technical interviews, communication, and participation in open source projects

To learn more about LadyCoders, check out their site, especially their seminar section. If you’d be interested in attending a seminar in your area, shoot them an email: info@ladycoders.com.

dotCloud

Founded in 2008, dotCloud came on the platform-as-a-service scene with Python at the heart of their product. They really enjoy the readability of Python’s syntax as well as the availability of mature bindings for many of the libraries they wanted to build on, such as zeromq and messagepack. They’re big fans of gevent for its ability to sustain the workloads they experience.

dotCloud was a part of our inaugural Startup Row at PyCon 2011 in Atlanta, which took place shortly after they launched their multilanguage service into beta. Since then, they’ve won several awards from GigaOm, VentureWire, Forbes, and SDTimes.

Over time they’ve grown to support 14 languages and databases, but they see over 20% of their active user base built on Python. It’s also their language of choice when it comes to open source tools they build, including ZeroRPC. “In short, we owe our success to the awesome Python community - and PyCon embodies that community,” says Elena Gorman.

By March the company hopes to have some great new features ready which will make dotCloud the goto option for first-timers to PaaS solutions, especially when it comes to Python. They’re also building out their web UI to include the features of their popular command line tools. If you’re interested in getting a taste of dotCloud, check out their sandbox and get a free app up and running in seconds.

PyCoder’s Weekly

Coming up on their first year on the web is Python news curator PyCoder’s Weekly. Every Friday, Mahdi Yusuf and Mike Grouchy share the best of that week’s talk about Python, from new projects, blog posts, available jobs, upcoming events, and anything else that a Python user would want to know. In exchange for an email (they hate spam as much as you do!), they’ll send you the goods.

The site is built on Django which serves the dual purpose of making their job as curators much easier, and growing their skills with the framework in a fun project. “That being said, looking through and vetting tons of projects and articles every week keeps us pretty well versed in this fast paced community,” they say of the volume of news being passed on to them.

Their involvement in PyCon makes perfect sense. While PyCon has grown to over 2,000 attendees, that’s only a tiny fraction of the total user base of Python, and the PyCoder’s curators hope to share the vibe at the conference with everyone at home.

“We hope and strive to make each issue of Pycoder's Weekly of Interest to the Python community regardless of Python experience level,” says Yusuf. Check out the site and sign up to keep in tune with the news of the week.

Counsyl

Python is everywhere at Counsyl. The San Francisco-based medical genomics company uses Python heavily on the backend, with NumPy, SciPy, PyOpenCL, and pandas in their arsenal. Their web experience comes thanks to Django, both for their internal applications and external presence. “We’ve even experimented with using Python on mobile, with Kivy and python-for-android,” exclaims Justine Lam of Counsyl. She continues by stating, “Python’s a great choice for us because it can be used at every level of the codebase.”

The team at Counsyl enjoys PyCon for the opportunity to learn from and give back to the community that created the tools that they rely on. They’re obviously heavy into the scientific areas of Python, and with so many of the science types coming out to PyCon each year, it’s a natural fit for them to sponsor and attend the conference.

“Also, of course, it’s a great place to meet talented Python developers,” Justine says of the atmosphere. One of those talented developers they met happened to be one of Django’s core developers, who later joined the team at Counsyl.

Stop by the Counsyl booth in the expo hall and say hi. They’re a friendly bunch and we’re happy to have them once again on the sponsor list.



If you’re interested in joining these fine organizations in support of PyCon 2013, check out our sponsor prospectus and email conference chairman Jesse Noller at jnoller@python.org for more details.

2013-01-30

Poster Selections Announced

We’re all about schedules around here. We got started by announcing the tutorial schedule, then a bit later put out the talk schedule. Just the other day we announced the sponsor tutorial schedule. The poster session is on the master schedule from 10:10 to 1:10 on Sunday March 17, but the event itself doesn’t have a schedule, so we present to you, the poster list.

The poster session is a recent addition to the PyCon schedule, being introduced in Atlanta for PyCon 2010 with a showing of 17 posters. As with just about everything relating to PyCon, the event has grown significantly to where the 2013 list includes 50 posters and will take place in a room several times the size of the 2010 event.

Think of a poster as a more intimate talk, where the discussion is driven by who’s at the poster and what they’re interested in engaging. When you’re in a talk or a tutorial, you sit and listen to the talk the presenter has prepared, then ask questions at the end. When you’re at a poster, you join or start a discussion about whatever tickles your fancy about the poster. The spontaneity of the event brings out some awesome discussions and gets more people involved.

If I’m at the “Developing an Early College IT/CS/Math Program Using Python” poster that Jeffrey Elkner and Kevin Reed are sharing, I’m interested to know what they’ve done around retention, so I’ll take a few minutes to read up on their poster, then ask them and they’ll have a bit to share. Knowing how these things turn out, there’ll probably be another educator standing next to me who will chime in with their methods, then the whole thing snowballs from there, picking up more interested people, turning every which way as the conversation grows. It’s really a fun environment.

Take a look at the selections for 2013 at https://us.pycon.org/2013/schedule/posters/list/ and start thinking up your questions. The program guide you’ll receive at the conference will show how the posters will be organized, but it’s easy enough to just walk up and down the aisles finding the topics and discussions that interest you.

You can also check out the 2012 posters thanks to the five minute videos which were recorded before the session began. They’re the first bunch of videos at http://pyvideo.org/category/17/pycon-us-2012 (they’re all prefixed with the poster ID from the program guide).

2013-01-28

Sponsor Tutorial Schedule

As we announced on Friday, Sponsor Tutorials are a new event for PyCon 2013, and we’ve added them to the schedule on our site: https://us.pycon.org/2013/schedule/sponsor-tutorials/.

These workshops will run concurrently with our instructor-lead tutorials on March 13 and 14. The 90 minute sessions are lead by our sponsors and are being offered free of charge. They provide a great opportunity to learn something new from some of the coolest Python using companies around.

The new schedule includes detail on each of the tutorials and profiles for each other presenters, just like we do for our tutorials and talks. You can now see that Mitch Garnaat will be taking you through the process of setting up an AWS application, and Jason Carr will help you plug Selenium into your Jenkins or Travis environments.

Check out the full schedule for more detail from all of our awesome sponsors who are participating!

Interview with tutorial presenter Dave Beazley

Dave Beazley is no stranger to PyCon. He’s been attending them since the beginning, including a few last-minute road trips, the ones close to home in Chicago, and all the ones in between. Throughout the years he’s given several mind blowing talks, followed up some of those talks with equally mind blowing open spaces. He has presented before the entire audience on the plenary stage, and has brought his educational skills on the road for numerous tutorial sessions.

For PyCon 2013 he’s running two great tutorials: Wednesday afternoon’s “Learn Python Through Public Data Hacking”, and Thursday afternoon’s “Python 3 Metaprogramming.” The first aims to introduce Python to complete beginners, and the second aims to fill the advanced user’s tool belt with some of the shiny new features of Python 3. He’s also sponsoring this year’s conference, a first for Dabeaz, LLC.

For the Beginner

When it comes to the Learn Python tutorial, the emphasis really is on the first two words: Learn Python. “It's a tutorial for complete beginners, but with a completely different focus than what you normally see,” he states. “For example, instead of having students write a one-line ‘hello world’ program, I'll start out by having them write a six-line program that tells them when the next city bus will drive by my office,” speaking of his Clark Street office on the north side of Chicago.

The approach gets away from the standard examples like fibonacci, instead showing off Python’s power right out of the gate. The students then learn that they can leverage other civic datasets on crime and buildings to create interesting mashups.

One of Dave’s more interesting mashups involved a correlation between the City of Chicago’s rat and rodent baiting database and available FourSquare checkins on Twitter. “Both sets of data included geographic coordinates so the program would watch Twitter for people checking into places, pull the coordinates, and check the rodent database to see if any nearby rats had been recently reported,” he explains. “If so, a special Twitter ‘rat’ account would reply with a simple ‘squeak’ message and nothing else. Silly stuff to be sure.”

“The thing I like about these kinds of examples is that they are real-world, yet something that everyone can relate to in their day-to-day life,” says Beazley. Hopefully none of you got the “squeak” reply on Twitter, though.

On top of learning the Python language, attendees will get their hands on the Pandas library as well as IPython’s notebook feature. “In my opinion, IPython notebook and Pandas might be the two most exciting Python projects going right now,” he enthusiastically stated.

Building Tomorrow’s Experts

Dave’s second tutorial, “Python 3 Metaprogramming,” digs much deeper for an advanced look into Python’s powerful metaclass, descriptor, and decorator features. He also covers a few very new features, including the function signature objects of PEP 362, which were implemented in the 3.3 release of CPython, which took place in September 2012.

I asked him what he thought about Python 3 in general and he had plenty to say.

He began by stating, “the best advance of Python 3 is the fact that it has taken a huge collection of ‘hacks’ that people were already doing with Python 2 and organized them into a coherent system of features.”

When it comes to looking into Python 3, one of the common issues is one of backwards incompatibility. For example, the
print statement is now a function in Python 3, which will cause a SyntaxError at runtime when given the Python 2 style usage. “I know a lot of programmers are fixated on the whole backwards-incompatible aspect of Python 3, but that is really missing the big picture”, he opines.

Dave’s view is that if you approach Python 3 with an open mind and you take what it gives you, you’ll walk away with knowledge of a better language than you came in with. “After you use it for a while, you just won't want to go back to Python 2,” he says of the new version. “You can do some pretty amazing things without having to resort to crazy hacks,” referring to a myriad of dances involved in some deeper aspects of Python 2 code.

If you’re looking to take your Python knowledge to the next level, the metaprogramming tutorial is a good way to get there. Given that Python 3 is the future, with all feature development now focused on the 3.x line, the tutorial provides a great opportunity to expand your knowledge and get with the times as Python 3 continues to grow.

Cooking with Python 3

On pace for a May release, Dave and co-author Brian Jones (who collaborated with Dave on a tutorial in 2011) are looking forward to the third edition of the Python Cookbook. The book has been entirely rewritten for Python 3 and adds a lot more material, including some of Dave’s favorite in areas of concurrency and classes. He's also including a lot of great material on metaprogramming, some of which you're likely to see in his tutorial. There’s also an extensive chapter on C extensions.

“I’ve learned more working on the Cookbook than any past writing project,” he says of the experience. “I think people will like it.”


If you can’t make any of the tutorials, Dave runs training courses out of his Chicago office as well as on-site. He’s run the gamut of Python’s feature set not just through his coursework but also in his work writing the Python Essential Reference as well as the Cookbook.

He’s running both introductory and advanced courses in February and May, respectively. While February’s “Practical Python Programming” is already sold out, the “Advanced Python Mastery” and “Write a Compiler” courses are open and accepting students.

The organizers thank Dave for sponsoring PyCon 2013, and we’re looking forward to the great tutorials he’s sharing with the community. Don’t forget to register for the conference before it sells out. Reserve a seat in any of our great tutorial selection while you’re at it!

PyCon 2013: PyLadies Lunch @ PyCon

PyLadies Lunch @ PyCon

This year, there is such an amazing line up of talks, tutorials, events, and sponsors that we're sure you don't have enough planned. PyLadies have organized to host a lunch for women attending the conference who love Python, or who want to learn more about Python or PyLadies.

What's this all about?

PyLadies is a mentorship group for women in the Python community. Come join us for an opportunity to chat with your fellow female Pythonistas while taking a break from the jam-packed PyCon schedule.

Who: Women who love coding in Python

When: Saturday, March 16th, 12:30pm - 1:30pm

Where: Second floor, Rooms 209/210

We invite any woman conference-goer to lunch at an informal, friendly meet & greet to form connections, and share Python programming stories.

RSVP!

Be sure to reserve your spot as space is limited! Eventbrite - PyLadies Lunch @ PyCon 2013

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Lynn Root.

PyCon 2013: Young Coder "Lets Learn Python" Registration Now Available!

Young Coder Registration Now Available!

Back in July, we announced The Young Coder: Let's Learn Python tutorial. We've received an overwhelming response of excitement and interest. Registration is now open! Eventbrite - Young Coder: Let's Learn Python

About the Tutorial

This free tutorial will explore how to program using Python by making games. The workshop will start with learning Python's simple data types, including numbers, letters and strings, and lists. We will also explore comparisons, if-statements, and loops. Finally, we will combined our new knowledge by creating our own game using the PyGame library.

Timing

The one-day workshop is being hosted on Wednesday, March 13th and Thursday, March 14th. Originally, one day was planned, but added a second day to accommodate demand.

Which day should you choose?

Wednesday's tutorial is for 12 year olds - 15 year olds. Thursday's tutorial is for 15 year olds - 18 year olds(ish).

What is the day schedule?

9:00am - 1:00pm: Introduction + PyGame Tutorial 1:00pm - 2:00pm: Lunch (provided) 2:00pm - 4:00pm: Hacking (optional)

What is this "hacking"?

After the tutorial and lunch, if the attendee would like to work on learning more about Python and his/her Raspberry Pi - stick around. We will provide space and volunteers to continue hacking on the game from earlier that day, or help you explore more possibilities with Python.

Resources

Every attendee will be provided with a Raspberry Pi to take home, as well as the great book, Hello World! Computer Programming for Kids and Other Beginners.

The PyCon organizers will provide the space as well as the monitors + keyboards for the day. The Raspberry Pi will already be set up with the needed software and dependencies.

There will be volunteer TAs during the day to help with questions and setup for the attendees. If you are interested in volunteering to help out in some fashion, please email us!

About the instructors

Katie Cunningham

Katie Cunningham is a Python developer at Cox Media Group and a DC native. She’s a fervent advocate for Python, Open Source Software, and teaching more people how to program. She also helps organize PyLadies in the DC area, a program designed to increase diversity in the Python community. She has taught classes for the organization, bringing novices from instillation to writing their first app in 48 hours.

Katie is an active blogger at her website, covering issues such as Python, accessibility, and the trials and tribulations of working from home.

Barbara Shaurette

Barbara is an open source veteran, with almost 15 years of experience as a professional developer, and at least five as an active participant in the Python and Django communities. She has also volunteered as a teacher and mentor through organizations such as PyLadies and Code Scouts. Currently, she works as a data consultant for the Texas Tribune.

Learn more about what Barbara is up to at her blog and through Austin PyLadies.

Registration

Sign up is available now, and expected to sell out quickly! Eventbrite - Young Coder: Let's Learn Python

Still have questions?

Feel free to email Lynn Root with any questions or concerns you may have.

2013-01-25

Introducing the Sponsor Workshops

When we said we were pulling out all the stops for PyCon 2013, we weren't kidding. We've put together an increased selection of talks. We'll be running a tutorial for children. There's an education summit. PyData is running a conference during the sprints. There are a lot more events to list, and there's a bunch we're still working on (top secret stuff). One that we're happy to announce today is the Sponsor Workshop series.

Nine of our sponsors will be running free workshops throughout the tutorial days on Wednesday March 13th and Thursday the 14th, starting at 9 AM and running into the early evening. Each workshop is 90 minutes long and gives you a chance to interact with the brains behind some of the Python world's coolest products.

SendGrid will be getting into hardware hacking. Heroku is talking about the 12-factor app. New Relic and Disney are looking into performance. Amazon Web Services is sharing their productivity secrets. Sauce Labs will help you get your continuous integration done right. Red Hat and ActiveState are sharing what's new with their clouds. Google is running a mini-series ending with an ask-me-anything!

Take a look for yourself and reserve your spot! http://py2013workshops.eventbrite.com/

Don't forget to register for the conference! We've sold over 1,800 tickets and they're moving quickly, with a cap of 2,500. You don't want to miss this.

2013-01-24

PyCon US 2013 Artwork, by the amazing Idan Gazit

Oh, its getting closer - 48 days until PyCon US 2013 kicks off - you have registered, right?

One of the joys I get helping the foundation put together PyCon US is being able to tap the talents of amazing people - one of those is Idan Gazit, who designed the non-web artwork for PyCon 2012, and has once again done it for PyCon 2013. Each of his designs has been unique, but I have to say, 2013's design really takes the cake:

Modern python final

 

This piece just makes me happy on so many levels - it's retro and futuristic at the same time - it incorporates the theme ("Change the Future") and hints and the surprises we have in store for the conference. It's beautiful in its simplicity.

This artwork will be featured in the mobile application we will once again have, the print program and the t-shirts. Note, that t-shirts are an additional cost / checkbox when registering for PyCon 2013 - we've focused majority of the funds this year to some special projects - Financial Aid being one of them. So if you want to get what will sure to be a keeper of a t-shirt, be sure to let the registration team know.

My deep personal thanks go to Idan for making this - he did so under a lot of other external pressures, family time, etc. I of all people know how hard it is to steal time from so many other things to put thought and creativity into things - so thank you Idan.

2013-01-22

Around the World in 10 Python Conferences

Larry Hastings had a busy 2012. Throughout the year he made his way to five continents, attending 10 Python conferences. The 3.4 release manager and host of Radio Free Python was on stage for four of them, and sprinted at each of them. Most of all, he had a blast and got to meet wonderful Python people all around the globe.

Larry got his introduction to Python around 1996, and his time as a core CPython contributor started within the last few years. However, he did have a contribution accepted into Python 1.5.1b2, but it was backed out before the final release and was revived again for 3.1, almost 11 years later!

The first PyCon Larry attended was in 2008, the first of two events in Chicago. He followed that up with each US-based PyCon since then, making the trips to Atlanta and Santa Clara, before adding EuroPython to the mix in 2011. “After that it sort of snowballed,” he said of what became of 2012.

Here’s where he ended up:

  1. Santa Clara, California, USA for PyCon US
  2. Florence, Italy for EuroPython
  3. Tokyo, Japan for PyCon JP
  4. Coventry, England for PyCon UK
  5. Cape Town, South Africa for PyCon ZA
  6. Dublin, Ireland for PyCon Ireland
  7. Conway, Arkansas, USA for pyArkansas
  8. Montevideo, Uruguay for PyCon UY
  9. Buenos Aires, Argentina for PyCon Argentina
  10. Rio de Janeiro, Brasil for PythonBrasil

Kicking off the 2012 season in the US with his “Stepping Through CPython” talk set the tone for several later conferences, where he was asked to bring the talk back on stage at PyCon ZA, PyCon Argentina, and PythonBrasil, the last of which was a keynote slot.

“Besides learning a lot about Python, I learned that Pythonistas are unfailingly friendly, charming, and intelligent. I made a new friend at every PyCon!” he said of his trip around the globe.




“I also learned that PyCons can still be fun even if you don't speak the language,” he said of his international travels. When it came to the language barriers in several locations, some of them had dedicated English tracks, such as PyCon JP in Tokyo. He suggested getting in contact with the organizers to get a feel for what it’ll be like for those who don’t speak the local language.


Larry is kicking of 2013 with another talk at PyCon US, titled “All-Singing All-Dancing Python Bytecode” and happening Saturday afternoon. He’ll dive into what bytecode is and how to play around with it, and he does it all with Python 3. If you enjoyed his previous talks in 2010 and 2011, you’re in for another good one.

As for Larry’s schedule in 2013, he’s already on the PyCon US schedule in March, and he’s thinking about a trip to EuroPython. He’s considering adding a few more conferences to the plans, but intends to keep travel on the lighter side. “I’m no Kenneth Reitz,” he quipped, referring to Kenneth’s long year on the road.

“I hope to see you at a couple PyCons in 2013!” he closed with.

Thanks, Larry!

Be on the lookout for Radio Free Python’s next episode, where Larry interviews Armin Rigo, Alex Gaynor, and Maciej Fijalkowski of the PyPy team at http://radiofreepython.com/.

PyCon US 2013: Financial Aid Award letters have been sent!

Just a heads up - PyCon US 2013 Financial Aid emails have been sent out! Just be sure to check your spam folder; for some reason GMail chose to mark them as phishing/spam. If you're unsure; email pycon-aid@python.org!

2013-01-21

PyCon US 2013: Highlighting Lincoln Loop, Wingware, 10gen, Google, and SurveyMonkey

Our sponsors make PyCon possible, and every year we’re happy to see the returning organizations joined by first time supporters. We continue our sponsor highlights with Lincoln Loop, a first time sponsor!

Lincoln Loop

“Python makes what we do possible, so sponsoring events like PyCon is a no-brainer,” says Pete Baumgartner of Lincoln Loop. They’re a full-stack web shop that makes use of Python everywhere they can, from the back end to testing, deployment, and everything in between. Django is one of their specialties, and they’ve drafted up many of their best practices to share with the community.

“Sponsoring and attending PyCon helps us grow our network and brings us more business,” says Pete of their move to support the conference. A healthy Python community benefits Lincoln Loop, so they’re more than happy to give back and ensure the success of PyCon and Python. Last year they were added as a sponsor member of the Python Software Foundation.

They’ve recently released a team discussion tool called Ginger, and have an IRC logging and bot service in the works as well at https://botbot.me. They’re also running a series of educational screencasts to share their Python web knowledge at http://learn.lincolnloop.com/.

Wingware

Known for the popular Wing IDE, Wingware has been building Python tools since 1998. They’ve been a part of the PyCon sponsorship cadre since the very first event, back when PyCon was attended by only a few hundred people. After last year’s 2,300 person turnout and the expectation of a 2,500 sellout for 2013, Wingware looks forward to another round in Santa Clara.

The conference is “a friendly and exuberant place to learn more about Python, make new contacts, and meet old friends,” says Stephan Deibel. Make sure to stop by the Wingware booth in the expo hall and check out their latest releases. They always have good stuff to share and 2013 will be no different.

10gen

10gen, makers of MongoDB, use Python for a lot of things around the company. They maintain the PyMongo driver, and they’ve started 10gen Education, a training site that uses Python as the base language. “Python is fast and simple and made it simple for all developers of different backgrounds to learn MongoDB's basic feature set,” says Francesca Krihely of 10gen.

“It's tremendous to see how Python has grown in the past 10 years, and is being used everywhere from financial institutions to startups,” says Francesca. She added that “As the MongoDB community grows, we hope to support the continued development of Python applications running on MongoDB and build more open source solutions for the database.”

Before you run into the 10gen folks at their booth in the PyCon expo hall, check out their user groups and events lists for meetups near you.

Google

“Python is one of the key languages at Google today,” says Nilma Rubin of Google. From internal systems to their APIs, Python shows up everywhere around Google. Even YouTube’s code is primarily written in Python. “Some of the key contributors to the language are Googlers and we continue to actively promote, use, and support the language,” she adds.

Google has long been not only a PyCon sponsor, but a sponsor of the Python Software Foundation and the community in general. NIlma adds that “PyCon also gives us the opportunity to engage with others who use Python and learn how other developers and programmers use the language.”

Google’s own conference, I/O, is running May 15-17 at San Francisco’s Moscone Center. Check the Google Developers page for more details.

SurveyMonkey

SurveyMonkey has long supported PyCon, both in sponsorship and in offering their services for our post-conference surveys. They’re currently undergoing a full rewrite of the site’s codebase as well as a lot of supporting tools, and Python is at the forefront of it. It’s pretty awesome to have a top 500 site not just using Python, but rewriting to make more use of it.

“We're constantly looking to increase our Python knowledge and give back to the Python community,” says Jenna Brehmer. “We've invested heavily in Python and are motivated to keep the community and technology strong. We're also always looking for good Python engineers,” she added.

Be sure to check out SurveyMonkey and the others in our expo hall!

2013-01-15

PyCon US 2013: Highlighting net-ng, Web Cube, Python Academy, and SendGrid

At PyCon, we love our sponsors, and we hope you do as well. They help us keep the conference affordable, allow us to do the big things we have planned, and they’re a source of jobs for you - the community. Check out what a few of them are up to.

net-ng

Net-ng came to the Python world over 10 years ago, building most of their products using the Nagare framework they created in 2008. They use Python to enable their creation of highly scalable, robust applications, and offer Python training to business in France.

When asked about the importance of Python at net-ng, Jean-Luc Carre said, “Python is important for us because it provides multiple benefits such as a great community, strong performances and maintainability.” Jean-Luc went on to praise Python’s ease of use for the beginners to his team.

Their history with PyCon goes back to 2001 in Long Beach, CA, when PyCon was but a fraction of what it is today. Net-ng’s excitement over Python’s growth in popularity not only in business and in conferences extends to their interaction with fellow attendees. “Whenever our team attends PyCon, it's a great opportunity to share ideas, meet fantastic people, and learn new technologies, in a great atmosphere,” says Jean-Luc.

Net-ng proudly supports not only PyCon US, but also EuroPython and PyCon FR.

Web Cube

“We use Python for everything!” says Janet Noyes of Web Cube. Established in 2003, Web Cube provides a Django-based e-commerce and CMS platform, as well as other services -- with Python at the heart of it all. “Without Python, we would be years behind where we are now in terms of the maturity of our product,” says Janet. Web Cube makes use of Python for quick prototyping, allowing them to take products to the market quicker than the competition.

PyCon allows the Web Cube staff to continue to learn and hone their craft, according to Janet. “Python is changing, and this is a way for us to make sure that we are still up to speed,” she said when asked why attending the conference matters to them. They enjoy the interaction with attendees and speakers to ensure their practices are up-to-date, and to keep them at the leading edge of the Python world.

Janet closed by saying, “In addition, we are hiring Python developers, and we know that the best Python developers in the world will be here with us.”

Python Academy

When we asked Mike Müller why Python was important to Python Academy, the answer came easily. “Without Python, our company would not exist as it does today,” he simply said. Mike’s business is in teaching Python, both in open courses and on-site, so it’s pretty obvious what he’s using Python for.

While the majority of Python Academy’s courses take place in Germany, 2012 brought them to Italy, Poland, and Belgium. 2013 will bring them across the pond to collaborate on a course with fellow PyCon sponsor, David Beazley.

Along with teaching the language, Python Academy offers more focused training, with materials for science and engineering, high performance, databases, and more. They’re able to tailor each course to a client’s needs, pulling from a wide range of experience among their trainers, including many years as consultants and pair programming coaches.

Python Academy supports the Python community in every way possible. They’ve been PyCon sponsors for years, and they also support EuroPython, EuroSciPy, PyCon DE, and PyCon PL. Along with conference sponsorship, all of the trainers at the academy contribute open source code and work with user groups, even getting into conference organization!

SendGrid

At SendGrid, Python is at the core of their infrastructure. 120 million emails flow through their cloud-based email service each day, thanks in part to the Python ecosystem. Their developers enjoy the rich and robust projects the community has to offer, giving them a wide variety of tools to make their lives easier. Ultimately, Python helps them deliver outstanding value to their customers.

Supporting PyCon gets SendGrid’s name out to the community -- the one they looked to when they doubled in size in 2012. PyCon’s Job Fair is a great place to find your next employees or your next job, so be sure to check it out. SendGrid will be there. Will you?

2013-01-09

PyCon 2013 Schedule Now Available!

 The long awaited PyCon 2013 schedule is now available!



The tutorials had already been scheduled to allow for registration, but the talk schedule was the harder part to complete. We’ve now added another track, making for six of them, which raises the total talk count to 114 over the three days. It was a challenge to put all of the pieces together in logical groupings, to accommodate speaker availability, and to balance the 30 and 45 minute slot availability (a lot of people ask for 45, but as you can see, those are limited). Our Program Committee put in a lot of time and effort to make this happen, and the entire group of PyCon organizers thanks them.

The schedule includes one problem we’re really happy to have to have again: you’re going to have to choose wisely where you go because, as always, all of these talks are excellent. Thankfully we have a really good video crew, so you won’t actually miss anything. Just check out the video archive from PyCon 2012 to see for yourself.

The selections for this year came from two record pools of submissions. In 2012 we received 88 tutorial proposals, a record at the time, but the community shattered that with 129 for 2013. As for talks, this year we received 458 of them, an increase of 80 from last year’s record. When you put all of that together, we could be running several parallel versions of this conference, and they’d all be awesome.

Don’t forget to register for the conference! We’re 63 days away from kickoff, and we’re around 1,400 tickets sold of our capacity of 2,500.

PyCon 2013 poster CFP closes soon

You better get to work on your poster submission for PyCon. Like, now. That's right, you better get it submitted soon, because the PyCon 2013 Poster Session Call for Proposals closes on January 16th, which is just one week away.

Remember, the PyCon poster session is a great way to not only present an idea, project, or cool Python feature to the community, but for those that have never participated as a presenter at a conference before, it's a great way to introduce yourself to the community as well.

We welcome poster submissions on anything Python-related: projects, libraries, ideas, education, community; you get the idea. Want to be able to actually show off your topic? Great, bring your laptop and give demos to those interested.

The poster session is a fun two-hour window that will allow you, the presenter, to interact directly with those people interested in your topic. So like I said, get to work and let's see those submissions!

To submit a poster proposal, sign up or log in to your account and proceed to your account dashboard.

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2013-01-08

Announcing PyCon Australia 2013 – July 5–7, Hobart, Tasmania!

PyCon Australia is the national conference for users of the Python Programming Language. On 5–7 July 2013, we're returning to Hobart, Tasmania, bringing together students, enthusiasts, and professionals with a love of Python from around Australia, and from all over the World.

Once again, we'll have a weekend packed full of amazing content on all aspects of the Python ecosystem, presented by experts and core developers of the tools and frameworks you use every day.

We're excited about the return of Friday Night CodeWars, and of course, we've got the usual conference dinner, as well as two days of developer sprints following the conference proceedings.

We can't wait to share more about the conference in the coming months. Until then, subscribe to our announcement listfollow us on twitter, or add yourself to our Lanyrd page.

Now with three days of talks!

In 2013, before the main event kicks off, we're welcoming two new mini-conferences on the Friday 5 July.

DjangoCon AU is Australia's first national gathering for developers using the Django Web Framework. Presented by the Django Software Foundation, this mini-conference will feature a day of Django-specific talks and tutorials to support the growing community of Australian Django Developers.

The Python on OpenStack day is a day of in-depth talks and tutorials covering the OpenStack cloud platform – one of the most important growing Open Source Python projects – for Python developers.

 

Help shape our programme

Every year, we strive to bring the best of Python from around Australia to the one place, but we can always use some help to find the Python topics that you want to see at PyCon Australia.

If there's a topic that you really want to see at PyCon Australia, or there's a speaker who you think we really need to have on our programme, then head over to our topic or speaker suggestion form, and let us know all about it!

Dates & Venue

We'll be opening our Call for Proposals in late February, and we'll be closing it in early April.

Early Bird registration will open towards the end of March, and will run through April. Registration will remain open until close to the conference opening.

The conference will be held in July, where we're moving into a bigger, better venue at the Wrest Point Convention Centre in Hobart. The Miniconfs will be held on Friday 5 July, the conference proceedings are on Saturday 6 & Sunday 7 July, and the post-conference sprints will be on Monday 8 & Tuesday 9 July.

To keep track of our announcements, sign up to our (low-traffic) announcements mailing list..

About PyCon Australia

PyCon Australia is the national conference for the Python Programming Community. The fourth PyCon Australia will be held on July 5–7, 2013 in Hobart, Tasmania, bringing together professional, student and enthusiast developers with a love for developing with Python. PyCon Australia informs the country’s Python developers with presentations, tutorials and panel sessions by experts and core developers of Python, as well as the libraries and frameworks that they rely on.

To find out more about PyCon Australia 2013, visit our website at http://pycon-au.org or e-mail us atcontact@pycon-au.org.

PyCon Australia is presented by Linux Australia (www.linux.org.au) and acknowledges the support of our Platinum sponsor: Australian Computer Society (Tasmanian Branch) (www.acs.org.au); and our Gold Sponsor, Google Australia (www.google.com.au). For full details of our sponsors, see our website.


Help shape our programme

2013-01-03

Presenting a poster at PyCon - a first timer's perspective

You should present a poster at PyCon. Why? Why not is more like it! I presented a poster at PyCon for the first time last year, and it was a fantastic experience. Let me tell you why.

I have presented posters many times in the past at several conferences. Those poster sessions are usually the same ole' same ole'; you hang up your poster, maybe you are required to be there during a certain time period, maybe not. If you are required to be there at the poster, you might have a few people stop by and chat you up. You take down the poster, that's it. Not a whole lot to be gained, really.

Well, PyCon is much, much different. Sure, you put up the poster, are required to be there for an hour and a half, and you take down the poster. What's different is what actually happens during that hour and a half you are at your poster. You actually talk to people, probably a lot of people. I'd say I probably personally talked to a couple dozen people last year during the poster session, but had many more dozens actually stop by for a look at my poster, listen in on conversations, and pick up a flyer of my poster. That's the beauty of a poster session; if you want to get in on a conversation, then just chime in, the free and open exchange of ideas (and contact information) is what it is all about. You'd think that an hour and a half would be a long time to stand there, but believe me, it really flies by, and it's a lot of fun.

Simply put, the PyCon poster session is a low-pressure, low-stress way to share your idea, project, or something you have learned with the PyCon community.

The poster proposal submission deadline is January 16, 2013, which is fast approaching. Got a library you are working on you'd like to show off, a project that uses Python, or something else Python-related to present? Please submit a poster proposal, we'd love to have you at the poster session in 2013 in Santa Clara.

To submit a poster proposal, sign up or log in to your account and proceed to your account dashboard.

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