Thursday, September 29, 2011

PyCon DE 2011 - Three Keynotes: From the Outside, From the Inside, and Scientific

There will be three keynotes with different perspectives on software development
and Python.

Jan Lehnardt, a CouchDB developer, looks at Python from the outside and analyzes why some people tend to be religious about programming languages and what could be done about it for the benefit of the whole programming community.

Paul Everitt of Zope and Plone fame provides a deep inside into the development of Zope and other long-running, successful Python projects in general.

Andreas Schreiber from the German Aerospace Center sees the future of software engineering in the field of science and engineering in Python-based solutions. Examples from high performance computing demonstrate the power of Python in this field.

 
The first PyCon DE will be held October 4-9, 2011 in Leipzig, Germany.

A tutorial and barcamp day is followed by three days with talks in three parallel tracks and
two days of sprints.

More details can be found on the PyCon DE website.

Please pass this post on to those you feel may be interested.

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

PyCon DE 2011 - Only 25 Tickets Left

There are only 25 Tickets left. Online ticket sales will close September 30.
So hurry to get yours now.
 
The first PyCon DE will be held October 4-9, 2011 in Leipzig, Germany.

A tutorial and barcamp day is followed by three days with talks in three parallel tracks and
two days of sprints.

More details can be found on the PyCon DE website.

Please pass this post on to those you feel may be interested.

PyCon DE 2011 - Program as App


The conference program is now available as an App.

There are 54 talks plus three keynotes and three lightning
talk sessions spread over three days. The topics cover a wide
range. There should be something interesting for everybody
interested in Python.

The first PyCon DE will be held October 4-9, 2011 in Leipzig, Germany.

A tutorial and barcamp day is followed by three days with talks in three parallel tracks and
two days of sprints.

More details can be found on the PyCon DE website.

Please pass this post on to those you feel may be interested.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Need Tutorial Ideas?

To follow-up with last week's post on talk ideas, we've done some digging into what topics would make for good tutorials. The resulting lists contain a lot of the same topics as talk ideas, with a few interesting requests, including "anything from [plenary speaker] David Beazley".

We're now 15 days away from the October 12 deadline for proposals, and we don't want to start the review process without your proposal. PyCon's success depends on you, the community, to keep cranking out the great presentations you're known for. Tutorials are an especially great time at PyCon, as they're an excellent chance to expand your skill set thanks to the great educators of the community presenting their three-hour sessions at a bargain price.

If you're interested in flexing your teaching skills but need help narrowing down a topic, we recently polled the Python community to find out what they want. When asked, "Are there any particular subjects that you would like to see more tutorials about?", we found the following.

Desktop Software

  • Dabo framework
  • OS integration
  • Packaging and deployment
  • Python on Windows
  • PyQt, PyGTK, wxPython and other GUI frameworks

Language Integration

  • Advanced ctypes usage
  • Wrapping C, C++, and Fortran libraries
  • Python's C-API
  • Cython and Shedskin
  • Writing C/C++ for Python programmers

Performance

  • Profiling and analysis
  • Designing for speed
  • Writing optimal Python code

Web

  • Frameworks: Django, web2py, Pylons, Pyramid
  • Templating
  • WSGI - past, present, and future
  • Servers: Tornado, Hookbox

Concurrency and Parallelism

  • Celery, RabbitMQ, AMQP
  • multiprocessing and multithreading
  • gevent, eventlet, Twisted
  • microthreads, coroutines, generators
  • greenlet, Stackless

Entertainment

  • pygame, nodebox
  • 2D and 3D graphics programming

Software Engineering

  • All forms of testing
  • Library design
  • Building applications from the ground up

Python Implementations

  • PyPy, IronPython, Jython
  • Writing a Python compiler

Others

  • Natural Language Processing
  • Machine Learning
  • Devops tools
  • Robotics
  • Processing large amounts of data
  • SimPy

As with our previous post, note that this information isn't the canonical list of everything everyone wants to see, and any lack of a given topic just means our small sampling didn't request it. As with last time, we noticed some glaring omissions, including no requests for "cloud computing", a generally hot topic at PyCon. For comparison, last year's tutorial schedule included two cloud tutorials. Hopefully the list helps as a brainstorm session if you're looking for that last push to fill out a proposal.

You have 15 days to get your proposals in at http://us.pycon.org/2012/speaker/, and remember, you can still clean up and edit your proposals after the October 12, 2011 due date. In fact, we expect that most proposals will see changes as the review process begins. PyCon's program committee is tasked with putting together the best tutorial, talk, and poster lineups available, so they'll act as another set of eyes to help you out. From assisting in organization to helping flesh out an idea, the program committee is there to provide constructive criticism and make sure you get the most out of your proposal. Together, we can make PyCon 2012 a success for all.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Need Talk Ideas?

As you may know, the deadline for PyCon proposals is approaching. We're within 20 days of the October 12 deadline, so start finalizing your drafts, or for some of you procrastinators in the group, start thinking about what you want to submit! If you're just getting started, have a look at our call for proposals.

We're accepting proposals for tutorials, talks, and posters, so think about where your ideas fit in and submit away. For 2012, we've imposed a limit of two accepted proposals per person, but there's no limit to how many you can submit. We want to hear all of your ideas, but realize that we all need to share the stage.

If you're looking for ideas, we recently ran a survey of the Python community and found some interesting results which we've curated below. We've done some massaging of the data to pick out the core ideas and come up with what we feel is an accurate list of topics that people were asking for.

When asked, "Are there any particular subjects that you would like to see more talks about?", the respondents listed the following.

Web

  • Frameworks: Django, web2py, Pyramid, Flask, Plone, AppEngine
  • General web development, API development
  • Servers: Tornado
  • Technologies: web sockets

Entertainment

  • Game and graphics programming, 2D and 3D

Networking

  • Libraries: twisted, ZeroMQ, Celery, gevent, pipelines
  • General network programming, using plain sockets

Infrastructure

  • Performance and Scalability techniques, tools
  • Cloud technologies
  • Sysadmin/devops tools
  • Memory profiling: controlling memory use of python VM

Databases

  • NoSQL databases
  • Object Relational Mapers: SQLAlchemy, SQLObject
  • SQLite
  • DB API

Software Engineering

  • Best practices: design patterns, idioms, avoiding code smells, and NIH
  • Distributed systems
  • Concurrent and Parallel programming
  • Testing: unit testing, continuous integration
  • Data mining and visualization
  • Documentation
  • Internationalization and Localization
  • Parsers and code generators
  • Metaclasses

Science and Engineering

  • SciPy and NumPy
  • Scientific computing and data analytics
  • Bioinformatics, Genetics
  • Artificial Intelligence and Robotics
  • Computer Vision

Python Implementations

  • PyPy, IronPython, Jython
  • How to contribute
  • Python 3 progress
  • Embedded Python
  • The language: internals, improvements, design strategies
  • The status of the Global Interpreter Lock (GIL)
  • Targeting other languages through the CPython VM
  • Python on Windows

Working with other languages

  • C for Python programmers
  • PyObjC
  • IronPython, Jython

Project Distribution

  • Packaging and distribution
  • Deployment
  • PyPI mirroring
  • Windows - compiling to single executable

Desktop

  • Interactive application building
  • PyGTK, PyQT, PySide, Dabo
  • Large-scale desktop applications

Others

  • Community Management
  • GIS
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Python in education, law, business, design, every-day problems
  • Python for non-programmers
  • ERP
  • Health and Medical technologies
  • Comparing to Ruby, Java, C++, and others

When looking at the list, keep in mind that the appearance or disappearance of a topic doesn't mean a whole lot. The fact that people tend to answer to their strengths, e.g., web programmers want web stuff and desktop programmers want desktop stuff, coupled with a limited number of responses, means we may not have heard from a perfect sample of the community. You might notice that you don't see "security" in there, yet it's an important topic that we know for sure a lot of people are interested in. Take the suggestions above as a brainstorm, not the be-all end-all list of what we want at PyCon 2012.

If you think you have an idea for a talk, and we hope you do, sign up and submit it at http://us.pycon.org/2012/speaker/. You have until October 12, 2011 to submit your proposals, and keep in mind that your proposal is not set in stone when you hit submit. You're able to edit your proposals after submission, and the PyCon program committee will be providing feedback to help submitters fine-tune the details of each proposal before talk selection begins.

We're going to do a follow-up post with the same information on tutorials, so stay tuned.

Thanks to Mathieu Agopian and Ken Whitesell for contributing to this.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Announcing the first PyCon 2012 Plenary Talk - David Beazley, Mad Genius

I am very pleased to announce our first Plenary talk for PyCon 2012 - David Beazley. David should be very familiar to everyone in the Python community - he's a prolific trainer, developer, author and, well - mad genius. He is the brain behind the mind blowing Python GIL talk at Chicago Chipy meeting and the followup PyCon 2010 talk on understanding the Python GIL as well as his diabolical PyCon 2011 "Using Python 3 to Build a Cloud Computing Service for my Superboard II".

David is an independent software developer and book author living in the city of Chicago. Primarily working on programming tools, provide custom software development, and teach practical programming courses for software developers, scientists, and engineers. He is best known for his work with the Python programming language where he have created several open-source packages (e.g., Swig and PLY) and authored the acclaimed Python Essential Reference.

I've written David a blank check on subject matter - I think what I proposed to him was "technical - and diabolical". Given David's skill and track record, I am sure we're going to be far from disappointed.

You can see more about David at his website, or on twitter.

Wednesday, September 07, 2011

Announcing the first PyCon 2012 Keynote speaker: Paul Graham

I am pleased  to announce the first keynote speaker for PyCon 2012 - Paul Graham of Y Combinator and Lisp/Arc fame. PyCon 2012 represents the 10th annual PyCon US - and on this special occasion, I am proud to have Paul back as a keynote speaker (he did the keynote at PyCon 2003).

Paul Graham is an essayist, programmer, and investor, and recently well-known as one of the founders of Y Combinator. With PyCon held right in the heart of Silicon Valley, it seemed fitting to welcome Paul back for not just that it is the 10th anniversary, but also to celebrate the many startups and entrepreneurs that have come out of PyCon.

One of Paul’s signature essays is “The Python Paradox” - describing his experience that people doing interesting and innovative things are frequently attracted to Python. Paul’s insight has proven true, as Y Combinator has funded and advised numerous Python-using companies, from Dropbox to Disqus, to Reddit, Justin.tv and Convore. The list is sure to expand as Y Combinator is currently accepting applications for their winter cycle.

In addition to this, I am also pleased to announce that we will be "bringing back" the "Startup Row" we had at PyCon 2011 - we heard the feedback from the companies we showcased, and the attendees and based on that - Startup Row 2011 was a smashing success which we want to once again bring to PyCon.

Applications for Startup Row 2011 will open in mid October.

Currently, our Call for Proposals is in full swing - and we encourage everyone to submit talks, tutorials and posters for PyCon 2012; right now we're on target for a no-holds-barred-break-all-the-records conference, and we want everyone to be part of it.

Finally, if you missed it - we've also announced the new PyCon 2012 Jobs Fair page featuring job listing from PyCon sponsors - keep an eye on it, sponsors are adding jobs every day - this is a free add-on benefit for all silver level and above sponsors. Interested in being a sponsor? See the PyCon sponsors page and prospectus.

Feel free to also discuss at Reddit, and Hacker News!

- Jesse Noller, PyCon 2012 Chair

Friday, September 02, 2011

PyCon DE 2011 - Talks Timetable Published

The timetable of talks is online.

There are 54 talks plus three keynotes and three lightning
talk sessions spread over three days. The topics cover a wide
range. There should be something interesting for everybody
interested in Python.

The first PyCon DE will be held October 4-9, 2011 in Leipzig, Germany.

A tutorial and barcamp day is followed by three days with talks in three parallel tracks and
two days of sprints.

More details can be found on the PyCon DE website.

Please pass this post on to those you feel may be interested.

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Announcing the PyCon 2012 "Jobs Fair" page, sponsor benefit.

One of the things that the PyCon team struggles with each year is how to maximize the visibility of our sponsors - not only do they financially support PyCon, but many of them contribute back to our open source community, hire you - members of the community - and overall help lift all of us up. Maximizing visibility though, can be difficult. There are lines we should not cross due to the community and people focus of PyCon - it is a fine line to walk between maximizing sponsors' return on investment, and the needs and interests of attendees, and the community.

This is why I am happy to announce today, we, the PyCon team feel that we have found another great way to both showcase our sponsors, without whom the conference would not be possible, and also provide something of need and interest to the Python/PyCon community. Today, we're unveiling the "PyCon Jobs Fair" page. This is a new page on the PyCon website dedicated to job listings from our sponsors and will list open, active job openings from PyCon sponsors, in as much detail as the sponsors desire.

Starting today, all Silver (and above) sponsor packages include this benefit free of charge. (So if you aren't a sponsor yet - come join us!) All existing sponsors have already begun uploading jobs that they have open. We continue to encourage companies looking to hire Python talent to leverage the Python Jobs Board - but PyCon in and of itself represents a unique ability for those people looking for jobs to not just apply over the internet, but to also meet face to face with potential employers at the conference.

Time and time again, we hear stories of friends hiring, or being hired at PyCon, or due to work at PyCon (such as a giving a talk, or tutorial) - we hear from you, the community that you wish you had more visibility - in advance - to those companies who will be at PyCon, and actively hiring.

In the same breath, we have spoken to many sponsors and once again, we hear a common statement "We come to PyCon to pick up the best talent." - PyCon, with its potential 1500+ attendees represents a unique and special recruitment location for sponsors.  A good recruiter could cost you tens of thousands of dollars to help you find, meet and woo potential candidates, while a PyCon sponsorship not only gets you that recruitment venue, but also provides to you community good will, name recognition and much more.

We feel that this makes an excellent addition to the set of community and sponsor features we offer - not to mention an amazing conference. Our sponsors are hiring - and we want you to know!

I'm very happy to be releasing this for both the sponsors and the community. Our goal as a team is to make sure that this is the best PyCon for both groups than ever before. We will continually strive to achieve this through increased involvement with our sponsors and increased, continual dialog with the community on what they want to see at the conference.

I encourage all of you to keep a close eye on the main sponsors page - new ones are popping up quickly, and now also on the new jobs page, I expect more positions to be added over the upcoming weeks and the entries to be changing with some frequency. Existing sponsors can log into their accounts on the site and upload descriptions immediately (we've put up help and guidelines here).

I'm also looking forward to carry this idea forward - and begin work on planning a "jobs fair" focused portion/session for the conference in addition to our existing Expo Hall.

Thank You.

Jesse Noller - Chair, Python 2012